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Part 5      COUNTABLE INCOME AND RESOURCES

317:35-5-40.Scope and applicability
[Issued 7-14-95]
The rules in this Part are used to determine financial eligibility once categorical relationship and other factors of eligibility have been determined.

317:35-5-41.Determination of capital resources for individuals categorically related to aged, blind and disabled
[Revised 08-01-07]
(a) General. The term capital resources is a general term representing any form of real and/or personal property which has an available money value. All available capital resources, except those required to be disregarded by law or by policies of the OHCA or OKDHS are considered in determining need. Available resources are those resources which are in hand or under the control of the individual.
(1) In defining need, OHCA and OKDHS recognize the importance of a member retaining a small amount of resources for emergencies or special need and has established a maximum resource standard a member or family may hold and be considered in need.
(2) Capital resources are evaluated on a monthly basis in determining eligibility for an applicant for medical services. An applicant is determined ineligible for any month resources exceed the resource standard at any time during that month. When a member has resources which exceed the resource standard, case closure action is taken for the next possible effective date.
(3) State law is specific on the mutual responsibility of spouses for each other. Therefore, if husband and wife are living together, a capital resource and/or income available to one spouse constitutes a resource and/or income to the other. When there is a break in the family relationship and the husband and wife are separated, but not divorced or legally separated, they constitute a possible resource to each other and this possible resource is explored to determine what, if any, resource can be made available. When spouse is in a nursing facility, see Subchapter 9 and 19 of this Chapter.
(4) Only the resources of the child determined eligible for TEFRA are considered in determining eligibility.
(5) Household equipment used for daily living is not considered a resource.
(6) Each time that need is determined, gross income and the equity of each capital resource are established. Equity equals current market value minus indebtedness. The member may change the form of capital resources from time to time without affecting eligibility so long as the equity is not decreased in doing so or increased in excess of the allowable maximum resource standard. In the event the equity is decreased as the result of a sale or transfer, the reduction in the equity is evaluated in relation to policy applicable to resources disposed of while receiving assistance.
(b) Eligibility. In determining eligibility based on resources, only those resources available for current use or those which the member can convert for current use (no legal impediment involved) are considered as countable resources. Examples of legal impediments include, but are not limited to, clearing an estate, probate, petition to sell or appointment of legal guardian.
(1) Generally, a resource is considered unavailable if there is a legal impediment to overcome. However, the member must agree to pursue all reasonable steps to initiate legal action within 30 days. While the legal action is in process, the resource is considered unavailable.
(2) If a determination is made and documented that the cost of making a resource available exceeds the gain, the member will not be required to pursue action to make it available.
(3) Determination of available and unavailable resources must be well documented in the case record.
(4) The major types of capital resources are listed in Sections OAC 317:35-5-41.1 through 317:35-5-41.7. The list is not intended to be all inclusive and consideration must be given to all resources.

317:35-5-41.1.Home/real property

[Revised 09-01-16]
(a) Home property is excluded from resources regardless of value unless the individual is applying for long-term care services. [See 317:35-5-41.8(a) (relating to eligibility for long-term care services)]

(b) For purposes of the home property resource exclusion, a home is defined as any shelter in which the individual has an ownership interest and which is used by the individual as his/her principal place of residence. The home may be either real or personal property, fixed or mobile. Home property includes all property which is adjacent to the home.  Property has a value regardless of whether there is an actual offer to purchase. Verification of home/real property value is established by collateral contacts with specialized individuals knowledgeable in the type and location of property being considered.

(1) The home may be retained without affecting eligibility during periods when it is necessary to be absent for illness or other necessity. When it is determined that the member does not have a feasible plan for and cannot be expected to return to his/her home, the market value of the property is considered in relation to the resource. The member is responsible for taking all steps necessary to convert the resource for use in meeting current needs. If the member is making an effort to make the resource available, a reasonable period of time is given (not to exceed 90 days) to convert the resource. He/she is advised in writing that the 90-day period begins with the determination that the property be considered in relation to the resource. The 90-day period is given only if efforts are in progress to make the resource available. Any extension beyond the initial 90-day period is justified only after interviewing the member, determining that a good faith effort to sell is still being made and failure to sell is due to circumstances beyond the control of the member. A written notification is also provided to the member at any time an extension is allowed. Detailed documentation in the case record is required.

(2) If the member fails or is unwilling to take steps necessary to convert the resource for use in meeting current needs, continuing eligibility cannot be established and the member is advised as to the effective date of closure and of the right to receive assistance when the resources are within the maximum allowable resources provided other conditions of eligibility continue to be met.

(3) When a member sells his/her home with the intention of purchasing another home or when an insurance payment for damage to the home is received, a reasonable period of time is given to reinvest the money in another home. A reasonable period of time is considered to be not in excess of a 90-day period. Extensions beyond the 90 days may be justified only after interviewing the member, determining that a good faith effort is still being made and that completion of the transaction is beyond his/her control. This must be documented in the case record.

(4) At the point a member decides not to reinvest the proceeds from the sale of his/her home in another home, the member's plan for use of the proceeds is evaluated in relation to rules on resources disposed of while receiving assistance.

(5) A home traded for another home of equal value does not affect the member's eligibility status. If the home is traded for a home of lesser value, the difference may be invested in improvement of the new home.

(6) Absences from home for up to 90 days for trips or visits or six months for medical care (other than nursing facilities) do not affect receipt of assistance or the home exclusion as long as the individual intends to return home. Such absences, if they extend beyond those limits, may indicate the home no longer serves as the principal place of residence.

(7) Mineral rights associated with the home property are considered along with the surface rights and are excluded as a resource. However, mineral rights which are not associated with the home property are considered as a resource. Since evaluation and scalability of mineral rights fluctuate, the establishment of the value of mineral rights are established based on the opinion of collateral sources. Actual offers of purchase are used when established as a legitimate offer through a collateral source. Mineral rights not associated with home property which are income producing are considered in the same way as income producing property.  Refer to (11)(B) of this subsection for treatment of mineral rights as non-trade or non-business property.

(8) The market value of real estate other than home property owned by the member or legal dependent and encumbrances against such property are ascertained in determining the equity (including the cost to the member of a merchantable title to be determined when the resource approaches the maximum). The market value of real estate other than the home owned by the applicant is established on the basis of oral or written information which the applicant has on hand and counsel with persons who have specialized knowledge about this kind of resource. Refer to (11) of this subsection for exclusion of real estate that produces income.

(9) Land which is held by an enrolled member of an Indian tribe is excluded from resources as it cannot be sold or transferred without the permission of other individuals, the tribe, or a federal agency. If permission is needed, the land is excluded as a resource.

(10) A life estate conveys upon an individual or individuals for his/her lifetime, certain rights in property. Its duration is measured by the lifetime of the tenant or of another person; or by the occurrence of some specific event, such as remarriage of the tenant. The owner of a life estate has the right of possession, the right to use the property, the right to obtain profits from the property and the right to sell his/her life estate interest. However, the contract establishing the life estate may restrain one or more rights of the individual. The individual does not have title to all interest in the property and does not have the right to sell the property other than the interest owned during his/her lifetime. He/she may not usually pass it on to heirs in the form of an inheritance.

(A) When a life estate in property is not used as the member's home, it is necessary to establish the value. A computer procedure is available to compute the value of a life estate by input of the current market value of the property and the age of the life estate owner.

(B) The value of a life estate on mortgaged property is based on equity rather than market value and the age of the individual.

(C) In the event the member does not accept as valid the value of the life estate as established through this method, the member must secure written appraisal by two persons who are familiar with current values. If there is substantial unexplained divergence between these appraisals, the worker and the member will jointly arrange for the market value to be established by an appraisal made by a third person who is familiar with current market values and who is acceptable to both the member and the worker.

(11) Real and/or personal property which produces income is excluded if it meets the following conditions.

(A) Trade or business property. The existence of a trade or business may be established through business tax returns that would be used to compute self-employment earnings. If the current business tax return is unavailable, the existence of the business may be determined through other business forms, records, partnership, a detailed description of the business and its activities, etc. Once it is established that a trade or business exists, any property (real or personal) connected to it and in current use is excluded. This exclusion includes liquid assets, such as a bank account(s) necessary for the business operation. All property used by a trade or business and all property used by an employee in connection with employment is excluded as property essential to self support.  The income from the trade or business is determined as any other self-employment income.

(B) Non-trade or non-business property. Property which produces income but is not used in a trade or business is excluded if the total equity value does not exceed $6000, and the net return equals at least 6% of the equity annually. An equity value in excess of $6000 is a countable resource. If the equity exceeds $6000 and 6% return is received on the total equity, only the amount in excess of $6000 is a countable resource. An annual return of less than 6% is acceptable if it is beyond the individual's control, and there is a reasonable expectation of a future 6% return. Liquid resources cannot be excluded as income producing property or meeting the $6000/6% rule (mortgages, including contract for deed, and notes which are income producing are considered as liquid resources). The $6000/6% rule applies to all resources in total, and not separately. Examples of non-business income producing property are rental property, timber rights, mineral rights, etc.



317:35-5-41.2.Miscellaneous Personal property
[Revised 09-01-15]

(a) Property used to produce goods and services.  Personal property necessary to perform daily activities or to produce goods for home consumption is excluded if the equity value does not exceed $6,000. An equity value in excess of $6,000 is a countable resource.  The property does not have to produce a 6% annual return. The $6,000 equity maximum includes all such resources in total and does not pertain to each item separately.  Examples of property used to produce goods and services are tractors, wildcatting tools, mechanized equipment for gardening, livestock grown for home consumption, etc.

(b) Cash savings and bank accounts.  Money on hand or in a savings account is considered as a countable resource. Verification of the member's countable income or resources held in bank accounts or at other financial institutions can be established through an Asset Verification System (AVS). Title 56, O.S., Section 1671 provides that financial records obtained for the purpose of establishing eligibility for assistance or services must be furnished without cost to the member or the Agency.

(1) Checking accounts may or may not represent savings.  Current bank statements are evaluated with the member to establish what, if any, portion of the account represents savings. Any income which has been deposited during the current month is not considered unless it exceeds what is considered as ordinary maintenance expense for the month.

(2) Accounts which are owned jointly by the member and a person not receiving SoonerCare are considered available to the member in their entirety unless it can be established what part of the account actually belongs to each of the owners and the money is actually separated and the joint account dissolved.  When the member is in a nursing facility and the spouse is in the home or if both are institutionalized, a joint bank account may be maintained with one-half of the account considered available to each.

(c) Life insurance policies. If the total face value of all life insurance policies owned by an individual is $1,500 or less, the policies (both face value and cash surrender value) are excluded as resources. Verification of the member's countable income or resources held in bank accounts or at other financial institutions can be established through an AVS.

(1) If the total face value of all policies owned by an individual exceeds $1,500, the net cash surrender value of such policies must be counted as resources.  Life insurance policies which do not provide a cash surrender value (e.g., term insurance) are not used in determining whether the total face value of all policies is over $1,500.

(2) The face value of a life insurance policy which has been assigned to fund a prepaid burial contract must be evaluated and counted according to the policy on burial funds or, if applicable, the policy on the irrevocable burial contract.

(3) The net cash surrender value of insurance (i.e., cash surrender value less any loans or unpaid interest thereon) usually can be verified by inspection of the insurance policies and documents in the member's possession or by use of the OKDHS Form 08MP061E, Request to Insurance Company.

(4) Dividends which accrue and which remain with the insurance company increase the amount of resource.  Dividends which are paid to the member are considered as income if the life insurance policy is not an excluded resource.

(5) If an individual has a life insurance policy which allows death benefits to be received while living, and the individual meets the insurance company's requirements for receiving such proceeds, the individual is not required to file for such proceeds.  However, if the individual does file for and receive the benefits, the payment will be considered as income in the month it is received and countable as a resource in the following months to the extent it is available.  The payment of such benefits is not considered a conversion of a resource because the cash surrender value of the insurance policy is still available to the individual.  The individual is in effect, receiving the death benefits and not the cash surrender value.

(d) Burial spaces.  The value of burial spaces for an individual, the individual's spouse or any member of the individual's immediate family will be excluded from resources.  "Burial spaces" means conventional grave sites, crypts, mausoleums, urns, and other repositories which are customarily and traditionally used for the remains of deceased persons. "Immediate family" means the individual's minor and adult children, including adopted children and step-children; and the individual's brothers, sisters, parents, adoptive parents, and the spouse of these individuals.  Neither dependency nor living in the same household will be a factor in determining whether a person is an immediate family member. Verification of the member's countable income or resources held in bank accounts or at other financial institutions can be established through an AVS.

(e) Burial funds.  Revocable burial funds not in excess of $1,500 are excluded as a resource if the funds are specifically set aside for the burial arrangements of the individual or the individual's spouse.  Any amount in excess of $1,500 is considered as a resource. Burial policies which require premium payments and do not accumulate cash value are not considered to be prepaid burial policies. Verification of the member's countable income or resources held in bank accounts or at other financial institutions can be established through the AVS.

(1) "Burial funds" means a prepaid funeral contract or burial trust with a funeral home or burial association which is for the individual's or spouse's burial expenses.

(2) The face value of a life insurance policy, when properly assigned by the owner to a funeral home or burial association, may be used for purchasing "burial funds" as described in (1) of this subsection. The $1,500 burial fund exclusion must also be reduced by the face value of a life insurance policy for which a funeral provider has been made the irrevocable beneficiary, if the life insurance policy owner has irrevocably waived his or her right to, and cannot obtain, any cash surrender value the life insurance policy may generate.

(3) The burial fund exclusion must be reduced by the face value of life insurance policies owned by the individual or spouse; and amounts in an irrevocable trust or other irrevocable arrangement.

(4) Interest earned or appreciation on the value of any excluded burial funds is excluded if left to accumulate and become a part of the burial fund.

(5) If the member did not purchase his/her own prepaid burial, even if his/her money was used for the purchase, the member is not the "owner" and the prepaid burial funds cannot be considered a resource to him/her.  However, if the member's money was used by another to purchase the prepaid burial, the rules on transfer of property must be applied since the purchaser (owner) could withdraw the funds any time.

(f) Irrevocable burial contract. Oklahoma law provides that a purchaser (buyer) of a prepaid funeral contract may elect to make the contract irrevocable.  The irrevocability cannot become effective until 30 days after purchase.  For an irrevocable contract to be valid, the election to make it irrevocable must be made by the purchaser (owner) or the purchaser's guardian or an individual with power of attorney for the purchaser (owner).  In instances where the OKDHS Form 08MA084E, Management of Recipient's Funds, is on file in the nursing facility, the form serves as a power of attorney for the administrator to purchase and/or elect to make irrevocable the burial funds for the member. Verification of the member's countable income or resources held in bank accounts or at other financial institutions can be established through an AVS.

(1) The irrevocable contract shall not be considered a countable resource.

(2) Effective October 1, 2015, the cash value of any life insurance policies and/or designated accounts shall be excluded as a resource up to a maximum of $1,500. This exclusion shall be reduced dollar for dollar by the face value amount of any irrevocable prepaid burial contract.

(g) Medical insurance.  If a member is covered by insurance other than SoonerCare, then SoonerCare is the payer of last resort and should not be billed until all other payers have paid.  If payment is made directly to the member, the member must reimburse OHCA up to the amount paid by SoonerCare.  Any amount remaining after payment to OHCA is considered as an available resource.
317:35-5-41.3.Automobiles, pickups, and trucks
[Revised 09-01-15]

Automobiles, pickups, and trucks are considered in the eligibility determination for SoonerCare benefits. Verification of the member's countable resources held in bank accounts or at other financial institutions can be established through an AVS.

(1) Exempt automobiles. One automobile is excluded from counting as a resource.

(2) Other automobiles.The equity in other automobiles, pickups, and trucks is considered as a countable resource. The current market value, less encumbrances on the vehicle, is the equity. Only encumbrances that can be verified are considered in computing equity.

(A) The market value of each year's make and model is established on the basis of the "Avg. Trade In" value as shown in the current publication of the National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA) on "Cars, Trucks, and Imports".

(B) If a vehicle's listing hasbeen discontinued in the NADA book, the household's estimate of the value of the vehicle is accepted unless the worker has reason to believe the estimate is incorrect.

(C) The market value of a vehicle no longer operable is the

verified salvage value.
(D) In the event the member and worker cannot agree on the value of the vehicle, the member secures written appraisal by two persons who are familiar with current values. If there is substantial unexplained divergence between these appraisals or between the book value and one or more of these appraisals, the worker and the member jointly arrange for the market value to be established by an appraisal made by a third person who is familiar with current values and who is acceptable to both the member and the worker.

317:35-5-41.4.Stocks and bonds
[Issued 08-01-07]
(a) The member's equity in stocks and bonds (including U.S. Savings Bonds series A thru EE) is considered in relation to the maximum resource limit. The current market value less encumbrances is the equity. In general, determination of current market value can be obtained from daily newspaper quotations, brokerage houses, banks, etc.
(b) The current value of U.S. Savings bonds which have been held beyond the maturity date is the redemption value listed in the table on the back of the bond for the anniversary date most recently reached. If the bond has been held beyond maturity date, it has continued to draw interest. An acceptable determination of the value may be made by checking against a chart at the bank.

317:35-5-41.5.Purchase of promissory notes, loans, or mortgages
[Issued 08-01-07]
(a) The amount which can be realized from promissory notes, loans, mortgages, and similar instruments, if offered for immediate sale, constitutes a countable resource. Promissory notes, loans, mortgages, and similar instruments have value regardless of whether there is an actual offer. Appraisals obtained from bankers, realtors, loan companies and others qualified to make such estimates are obtained in determining current market value. When a total resource approaches the maximum, it is desirable to get two or more estimates.
(b) Promissory Notes, loans, and mortgages (including contracts for deed) which are income producing are liquid countable resources.
(c) For an individual who has purchased a promissory note, loan, or mortgage on or after February 8, 2006, and is applying for long-term care services, see OAC 317:35-5-41.8(b).

317:35-5-41.6.Trust accounts

[Revised 08-10-17]
  Monies held in trust for an individual applying for or receiving SoonerCare must have the availability of the funds determined. Funds held in trust are considered available when they are under the direct control of the individual or his/her spouse, and disbursement is at their sole discretion. Funds may also be held in trust and under the control of someone other than the individual or his/her spouse, such as the courts, agencies, other individuals, or the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA).

(1) Availability determinations. The worker should be able to determine the availability of a trust using the definitions and explanations listed in (2) of this subsection. However, in some cases, the worker may wish to submit a trust to the Oklahoma Department of Human Services(OKDHS) State Office for determination of availability. In these instances, all pertinent data is submitted to Family Support Services Division, Attention: Health Related and Medical Services Section, for a decision.

(2) Definition of terms.  The following words and terms, when used in this paragraph, have the following meaning, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise:

(A) Beneficiary.  Beneficiary means the person(s) who is to receive distributions of either income or principal, or on behalf of whom the trustee is to make payments.

(B) Corpus/principal.  Corpus/principal means the body of the trust or the original asset used to establish the trust, such as a sum of money or real property.

(C) Discretionary powers.  Discretionary powers means the grantor gives the trustee the power to make an independent determination whether to distribute income and/or principal to the beneficiary(ies) or to retain the income and add it to the principal of the trust.

(D) Distributions.  Distributions means payments or allocations made from the trust from the principal or from the income produced by the principal (e.g., interest on a bank account).

(E) Grantor (trustor/settlor).  Grantor (trustor/settlor) means the individual who establishes the trust by transferring certain assets.

(F) Irrevocable trust.  Irrevocable trust means a trust in which the grantor has expressly not retained the right to terminate or revoke the trust and reclaim the trust principal and income.

(G) Pour over or open trust.  Pour over or open trust means a trust which may be expanded from time to time by the addition to the trust principal (e.g., a trust established to receive the monthly payment of an annuity, a workers' compensation settlement, a disability benefit or other periodic receivable). The principal may accumulate or grow depending upon whether the trustee distributes the receivable or permits it to accumulate. Generally, the terms of the trust will determine the availability of the income in the month of receipt and the availability of the principal in subsequent months.

(H) Primary beneficiary.  Primary beneficiary means the first person or class of persons to receive the benefits of the trust.

(I) Revocable trust.  Revocable trust means a trust in which the grantor has retained the right to terminate or revoke the trust and reclaim the trust principal and income. Unless a trust is specifically made irrevocable, it is revocable. Even an irrevocable trust is revocable upon the written consent of all living persons with an interest in the trust.

(J) Secondary beneficiary.  Secondary beneficiary means the person or class of persons who will receive the benefits of the trust after the primary beneficiary has died or is otherwise no longer entitled to benefits.

(K) Testamentary trust.  Testamentary trust means a trust created by a will and effective upon the death of the individual making the will.

(L) Trustee.  Trustee means an individual, individuals, a corporation, court, bank or combination thereof with responsibility for carrying out the terms of the trust.

(3) Documents needed. To determine the availability of a trust for an individual applying for or receiving SoonerCare, copies of the following documents are obtained:

(A) Trust document;

(B) When applicable, all relevant court documents including the Order establishing the trust, Settlement Agreement, Journal Entry, etc.; and

(C) Documentation reflecting prior disbursements (date, amount, purpose).

(4) Trust accounts established on or before August 10, 1993.  The rules found in (A) - (C) of this paragraph apply to trust accounts established on or before August 10, 1993.

(A) Support trust. The purpose of a support trust is the provision of support or care of a beneficiary. A support trust will generally contain language such as "to provide for the care, support and maintenance of ...", "to provide as necessary for the support of ...", or "as my trustee may deem necessary for the support, maintenance, medical expenses, care, comfort and general welfare." Except as provided in (i)-(iii) of this subparagraph, the amount from a support trust deemed available to the beneficiary is the maximum amount of payments that may be permitted under the terms of the trust to be distributed to the beneficiary, assuming the full exercise of discretion by the trustee(s) for distribution of the maximum amount to the beneficiary. The beneficiary of a support trust, under which the distribution of payments to the beneficiary is determined by one or more trustees who are permitted to exercise discretion with respect to distributions, may show that the amounts deemed available are not actually available by:

(i) Commencing proceedings against the trustee(s) in a court of competent jurisdiction;

(ii) Diligently and in good faith asserting in the proceedings that the trustee(s) is required to provide support out of the trust; and

(iii) Showing that the court has made a determination, not reasonably subject to appeal, that the trustee must pay some amount less than the amount deemed available. If the beneficiary makes the showing, the amount deemed available from the trust is the amount determined by the court. Any action by a beneficiary or the beneficiary's representative, or by the trustee or the trustee's representative, in attempting a showing to make the Agency or the State of Oklahoma a party to the proceeding, or to show to the court that SoonerCare benefits may be available if the court limits the amounts deemed available under the trust, precludes the showing of good faith required.

(B) Medicaid Qualifying Trust (MQT).  A Medicaid Qualifying Trust is a trust, or similar legal device, established (other than by will) by an individual or an individual's spouse, under which the individual may be the beneficiary of all or part of the distributions from the trust and such distributions are determined by one or more trustees who are permitted to exercise any discretion with respect to distributions to the individual. A trust established by an individual or an individual's spouse includes trusts created or approved by a representative of the individual (parent, guardian or person holding power of attorney) or the court where the property placed in trust is intended to satisfy or settle a claim made by or on behalf of the individual or the individual's spouse. This includes trust accounts or similar devices established for a minor child pursuant to 12 O.S. 83. In addition, a trust established jointly by at least one of the individuals who can establish an MQT and another party or parties (who do not qualify as one of these individuals) is an MQT as long as it meets the other MQT criteria. The amount from an irrevocable MQT deemed available to the individual is the maximum amount of payments that may be permitted under the terms of the trust to be distributed to the individual assuming the full exercise of discretion by the trustee(s). The provisions regarding MQT apply even though an MQT is irrevocable or is established for purposes other than enabling an individual to qualify for SoonerCare, and, whether or not discretion is actually exercised.

(i) Similar legal device.  MQT rules listed in this subsection also apply to "similar legal devices" or arrangements having all the characteristics of an MQT except that there is no actual trust document. An example is the member petitioning the court to irrevocably assign all or part of his/her income to another party (usually the spouse). The determination whether a given document or arrangement constitutes a "similar legal device" should be made by the OKDHS Office of General Counsel, Legal Unit.

(ii) MQT resource treatment.  For revocable MQTs, the entire principal is an available resource to the member. Resources comprising the principal are subject to the individual resource exclusions (e.g., the home property exclusion) since the member can access those resource items without the intervention of the trustee. For irrevocable MQTs, the countable amount of the principal is the maximum amount the trustee can disburse to (or for the benefit of) the member, using his/her full discretionary powers under the terms of the trust. If the trustee has unrestricted access to the principal and has discretionary power to disburse the entire principal to the member (or to use it for the member's benefit), the entire principal is an available resource to the member. Resources transferred to such a trust lose individual resource consideration (e.g., home property transferred to such a trust is no longer home property and the home property exclusions do not apply). The value of the property is included in the value of the principal. If the MQT permits a specified amount of trust income to be distributed periodically to the member (or to be used for his/her benefit), but those distributions are not made, the member's countable resources increase cumulatively by the undistributed amount.

(iii) Income treatment. Amounts of MQT income distributed to the member are countable income when distributed. Amounts of income distributed to third parties for the member's benefit are countable income when distributed.

(iv) Transfer of resources.  If the MQT is irrevocable, a transfer of resources has occurred to the extent that the trustee's access to the principal (for purposes of distributing it to the member or using it for the member's benefit) is restricted (e.g., if the trust stipulates that the trustee cannot access the principal but must distribute the income produced by that principal to the member, the principal is not an available resource and has, therefore, been transferred).

(C) Special needs trusts.  Some trusts may provide that trust benefits are intended only for a beneficiary's "special needs" and require the trustee to take into consideration the availability of public benefits and resources, including SoonerCare benefits. Some trusts may provide that the trust is not to be used to supplant or replace public benefits, including SoonerCare benefits. If a trust contains such terms and is not an MQT, the trust is not an available resource.

(5) Trust accounts established after August 10, 1993. The rules found in (A) - (C) of this paragraph apply to trust accounts established after August 10, 1993.

(A) For purposes of this subparagraph, the term "trust" includes any legal document or device that is similar to a trust. An individual is considered to have established a trust if assets of the individual were used to form all or part of the principal of the trust and if the trust was established other than by will and by any of the following individuals:

(i) the individual;

(ii) the individual's spouse;

(iii) a person, including a court or administrative body, with legal authority to act in place of or on behalf of the individual or the individual's spouse; or

(iv) a person, including a court or administrative body, acting at the direction or upon the request of the individual or the individual's spouse.

(B) Where trust principal includes assets of an individual described in this subparagraph and assets of any other person(s), the provisions of this subparagraph apply to the portion of the trust attributable to the assets of the individual. This subparagraph applies without regard to the purposes for which the trust is established, whether the trustees have or exercise any discretion under the trust, and restrictions on when or whether distributions may be made from the trust, or any restrictions on the use of the distribution from the trust.

(C) There are two types of trusts, revocable trusts and irrevocable trusts.

(i) In the case of a revocable trust, the principal is considered an available resource to the individual. Payments from the trust to or for the benefit of the individual are considered income of the individual. Other payments from the trust are considered assets disposed of by the individual for purposes of the transfer of assets rule and are subject to the 60 months look back period.

(ii) In the case of an irrevocable trust, if there are any circumstances under which payments from the trust could be made to or for the benefit of the individual, the portion of the principal of the trust, or the income on the principal, from which payment to the individual could be made is considered available resources. Payments from the principal or income of the trust is considered income of the individual. Payments for any other purpose are considered a transfer of assets by the individual and are subject to the 60 months look back period. Any portion of the trust from which, or any income on the principal from which no payment could under any circumstances be made to the individual is considered as of the date of establishment of the trust (or if later, the date on which payment to the individual was foreclosed) to be assets disposed by the individual for purposes of the asset transfer rules and are subject to the 60 months look back period.

(6) Exempt trusts.  Paragraph (5) of this subsection does not apply to the following trusts:

(A) A trust containing the assets of a disabled individual under the age of 65 which was established for the benefit of such individual by the individual, parent, grandparent, legal guardian of the individual or a court if the State receives all amounts remaining in the trust on the death of the individual up to an amount equal to the total medical assistance paid on behalf of the individual. This type of trust requires:

(i) The trust may only contain the assets of the disabled individual.

(ii) The trust must be irrevocable and cannot be amended or dissolved without the written agreement of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services or the Oklahoma Health Care Authority.

(iii) Trust records must be open at all reasonable times to inspection by an authorized representative of the OHCA or OKDHS.

(iv) The exception for the trust continues after the disabled individual reaches age 65. However, any addition or augmentation after age 65 involves assets that were not the assets of an individual under age 65; therefore, those assets are not subject to the exemption.

(v) Establishment of this type of trust does not constitute a transfer of assets for less than fair market value if the transfer is made into a trust established solely for the benefit of a disabled individual under the age of 65.

(vi) Payments from the trust are counted according to SSI rules. According to these rules, countable income is anything the individual receives in cash or in kind that can be used to meet the individual's needs for food, clothing and shelter. Accordingly, any payments made directly to the individual are counted as income to the individual because the payments could be used for food, clothing, or shelter for the individual. This rule applies whether or not the payments are actually used for these purposes, as long as there is no legal impediment which would prevent the individual from using the payments in this way. In addition, any payments made by the trustee to a third party to purchase food, clothing, or shelter for the individual can also count as income to the individual. For example, if the trustee makes a mortgage payment for the individual, that payment is a shelter expense and counts as income.

(vii) A corporate trustee may charge a reasonable fee for services in accordance with its published fee schedule.

(viii) The OKDHS Form 08MA018E, Supplemental Needs Trust, is an example of the trust. Workers may give the sample form to the member or his/her representative to use or for their attorney's use.

(ix) To terminate or dissolve a Supplemental Needs Trust, the worker sends a copy of the trust instrument and a memorandum to OKDHS Family Support Services Division, Attention: Health Related and Medical Services (HR&MS) explaining the reason for the requested termination or dissolution of the Supplemental Needs Trust, and giving the name and address of the trustee. The name and address of the financial institution and current balance are also required. Health Related and Medical Services notifies Oklahoma HealthCare Authority/Third Party Liability(OHCA/TPL) to initiate the recovery process.

(B) A trust (known as the Medicaid Income Pension Trust) established for the benefit of an individual if:

(i) The individual is in need of long-term care and has countable income above the categorically needy standard for long-term care (OKDHS Appendix C-1 Schedule VIII.B) but less than the average cost of nursing home care per month (OKDHS Appendix C-1 Schedule VIII.B).

(ii) The Trust is composed only of pension, social security, or other income of the individual along with accumulated income in the trust. Resources cannot be included in the trust.

(iii) All income is paid into the trust and the applicant is not eligible until the trust is established and the monthly income has been paid into the trust.

(iv) The trust must retain an amount equal to the member's gross monthly income less the current categorically needy standard of OKDHS Appendix C-1. The Trustee distributes the remainder.

(v) The income disbursed from the trust is considered as the monthly income to determine the cost of their care, and can be used in the computations for spousal diversion.

(vi) The trust must be irrevocable and cannot be amended or dissolved without the written agreement of the OHCA. Trust records must be open at all reasonable times to inspection by an authorized representative of the OHCA or OKDHS.

(vii) The State will receive all amounts remaining in the trust up to an amount equal to the total SoonerCare benefits paid on behalf of the individual subsequent to the date of establishment of the trust.

(viii) Accumulated funds in the trust may only be used for medically necessary items not covered by SoonerCare, or other health programs or health insurance and a reasonable cost of administrating the trust. Reimbursements cannot be made for any medical items to be furnished by the nursing facility. Use of the accumulated funds in the trust for any other reason will be considered as a transfer of assets and would be subject to a penalty period.

(ix) The trustee may claim a fee of up to 3% of the funds added to the trust that month as compensation.

(x) An example trust is included on OKDHS Form 08MA011E. Workers may give this to the member or his/her representative to use or for their attorney's use as a guide for the Medicaid Income Pension Trust.

(xi) To terminate or dissolve a Medicaid Income Pension Trust, the worker sends a memorandum with a copy of the trust to OKDHS Family Support Services Division, Attention: HR&MS, explaining the reason and effective date for the requested termination or dissolution of the Medicaid Income Pension Trust, and giving the name and address of the trustee. The name and address of the financial institution, account number, and current balance are also required.  Health Related and Medical Services notifies OHCA/TPL to initiate the recovery process.

(C) A trust containing the assets of a disabled individual when all of the following are met:

(i) The trust is established and managed by a non-profit association;

(ii) The trust must be made irrevocable;

(iii) The trust must be approved by the Oklahoma Department of Human Services and may not be amended without the permission of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services;

(iv) The disabled person has no ability to control the spending in the trust;

(v) A separate account is maintained for each beneficiary of the trust but for the purposes of investment and management of funds, the trust pools these accounts;

(vi) The separate account on behalf of the disabled person may not be liquidated without payment to OHCA for the medical expenses incurred by the members;

(vii) Accounts in the trust are established by the parent, grandparent, legal guardian of the individual, the individual, or by a court;

(viii) To the extent that amounts remaining in the beneficiary's account on the death of the beneficiary are not retained by the trust, the trust pays to the State from such remaining amounts an amount equal to the total medical assistance paid on behalf of the individual. A maximum of 30% of the amount remaining in the beneficiary's account at the time of the beneficiary's death may be retained by the trust.

(7) Funds held in trust by Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). Interests of individual Indians in trust or restricted lands are not considered in determining eligibility for assistance under the Social Security Act or any other federal or federally assisted program.

(8) Disbursement of trust. At any point that disbursement occurs, the amount disbursed is counted as a non-recurring lump sum payment in the month received. Some trusts generate income on a regular basis and the income is sent to the beneficiary. In those instances, the income is treated as unearned income in the month received.

317:35-5-41.7.Retirement funds
[Issued 08-01-07]
The rules regarding the countable value, if any, of retirement funds are found in (1) - (2) of this subsection.
(1) Annuities.
(A) Annuities purchased prior to February 1, 2005. An annuity gives the right to receive fixed, periodic payments either for life or a term of years. The annuity instrument itself must be examined to determine the provisions and requirements of the annuity. For example, it is determined whether the individual can access the principal of the annuity; e.g., can it be cashed in. If so, the annuity is treated as a revocable trust (OAC 317:35-5-41.6(a)(5)(C)(i)). If the individual cannot access the principal, the annuity is treated as an irrevocable trust. In this instance, it must also be determined what part of the annuity can, under any circumstances, be paid to, or for the benefit of the individual. When making such a determination, the date of application is used or, if later, the date of institutionalization (for an institutionalized individual) or the date of creation of the annuity (for a non-institutionalized individual). Also, these dates are used in determining whether the transfer of asset provisions apply to a particular annuity. If the annuity provides for payments to be made to the individual, those payments would be considered income to the individual. Any portion of the principal of the annuity that could be paid to or on behalf of the individual would be treated as a resource to the individual and portions of the annuity that cannot be paid to or for the benefit of the individual are treated as transfers of assets. Annuities may also be a transfer of assets for less than fair market value. The worker determines, in accordance with the OKDHS life expectancy tables, whether the member will receive fair market value from the annuity during his/her projected lifetime. Any funds used to purchase the annuity that will not be repaid to the member during his/her projected lifetime, are a transfer of assets and the appropriate penalty period is imposed.
(B) Annuities purchased after January 31, 2005.
(i) An annuity is presumed to be an available resource to the individual who will receive the payments because the annuity can be sold. The value of the annuity is the total of all remaining payments, discounted by the Applicable Federal Rate set by the IRS for the valuation of annuities for the month of application or review.
(ii) The applicant or member may rebut the presumption that the annuity can be sold by showing compelling evidence to the contrary, in which case the annuity is not considered available. The applicant or member may also rebut the presumed annuity value by showing compelling evidence that the actual value of the annuity is less than the presumed value.
(C) For an individual who has purchased an annuity on or after February 8, 2006, and is applying for long-term care services, see OAC 317:35-5-41.8(c).
(2) Other retirement investment instruments. This paragraph relates to individual retirement accounts (IRA), Keogh plans, profit sharing plans, and work related plans in which the employee and/or employer contribute to a retirement account.
(A) Countability of asset. In each case, the document governing the retirement instrument must be examined to determine the availability of the retirement benefit at the time of application. Retirement benefits are considered countable resources if the benefits are available to the applicant and/or spouse. Availability means that the applicant and/or spouse has an option to receive retirement benefits or is actually receiving benefits. For example, a retirement instrument may make a fund available at the time of termination of employment, at age 65, or at some other time. A retirement fund is not a countable resource if the applicant is currently working and must terminate employment in order to receive benefits. An individual may have the choice of withdrawing the monies from the retirement fund in a single payment or periodic payments (i.e., monthly, quarterly, etc.). If the individual elects to receive a periodic payment, the payments are considered as income as provided in OAC 317:35-5-42(c)(3). If the monies are received as a lump sum, the rules at OAC 317:35-5-42(c)(3)(C)(i) apply.
(B) Asset valuation. Valuation of retirement benefits is the amount of money that an individual can currently withdraw from the fund or is actually receiving. Valuation does not include the amount of any penalty for early withdrawal. Taxes due on the monies received by the applicant are not deducted from the valuation.
(C) Timing of valuation. Retirement funds are a countable resource in the month that the funds are available to the applicant. For purposes of this subsection, the month that the funds are available means the month following the month of application for the funds. For example, the retirement instrument makes retirement funds available at age 65. The applicant turns 65 on January 1st. The applicant makes a request for the funds on February 1st and the monies are received on June 1st. The retirement fund would be considered as a countable resource in the month of March. The resource would not be counted in the month in which it is later received.

317:35-5-41.8.Eligibility regarding long-term care services
[Revised 09-01-16]

(a) Home Property. In determining eligibility for long-term care services for applications filed on or after January 1, 2006, home property is excluded from resources unless the individual's equity interest in his or her home exceeds $500,000 (increased by the annual percentage increase in the urban component of the consumer price index beginning in 2011, rounded to the nearest $1,000).

(1) Long-term care services include nursing facility services and other long-term care services. For purposes of this Section, other long-term care services include:

(A) A level of care in any institution equivalent to nursing facility services; and

(B) Home and community-based services furnished under a waiver.

(2) An individual whose equity interest exceeds $500,000 (increased by the annual percentage increase in the urban component of the consumer price index beginning in 2011, rounded to the nearest $1,000) is not eligible for long-term care services unless one of the following circumstances applies:

(A) The individual has a spouse who is lawfully residing in the individual's home;

(B) The individual has a child under the age of twenty-one who is lawfully residing in the individual's home;

(C) The individual has a child of any age who is blind or permanently and totally disabled who is lawfully residing in the individual's home; or

(D) The denial would result in undue hardship. Undue hardship exists when denial of SoonerCare long-term care services based on an individual's home equity exceeding $500,000 would deprive the individual of medical care such that the individual's health or life would be endangered; or of food, clothing, shelter, or other necessities of life.

(E) An individual may reduce their total equity interest in the home through the use of a reverse mortgage or home equity loan.

(3) Absence from home due to nursing facility care does not affect the home exclusion as long as the individual intends to return home within 12 months from the time he/she entered the facility. The OKDHS Form 08MA010E, Acknowledgment of Temporary Absence/Home Property Policy, is completed at the time of application for nursing facility care when the applicant has home property. After an explanation of temporary absence, the member, guardian, or responsible person indicates whether there is or is not intent to return to the home and signs the form.

(A) If at the time of application the applicant states he/she does not have plans to return to the home, the home property is considered a countable resource. For members in nursing facilities, a lien may be filed in accordance with OAC 317:35-9-15 and OAC 317:35-19-4 on any real property owned by the member when it has been determined, after notice and opportunity for a hearing, that the member cannot reasonably be expected to be discharged and return home. However, a lien is not filed on the home property of the member while any of the persons described in OAC 317:35-9-15(b)(1) and OAC 317:35-19-4(b)(1) are lawfully residing in the home:

(B) If the individual intends to return home, he/she is advised that:

(i) the 12 months of home exemption begins effective with the date of entry into the nursing home regardless of when application is made for SoonerCare benefits, and

(ii) after 12 months of nursing care, it is assumed there is no reasonable expectation the member will be discharged from the facility and return home and a lien may be filed against real property owned by the member for the cost of medical services received.

(C) "Intent" in regard to absence from the home is defined as a clear statement of plans in addition to other evidence and/or corroborative statements of others.

(D) At the end of the 12-month period the home property becomes a countable resource unless medical evidence is provided to support the feasibility of the member to return to the home within a reasonable period of time (90 days). This 90-day period is allowed only if sufficient medical evidence is presented with an actual date for return to the home.

(E) A member who leaves the nursing facility must remain in the home at least three months for the home exemption to apply if he/she has to re-enter the facility.

(F) However, if the spouse, minor child under 21, or child who is blind or permanently disabled resides in the home during the individual's absence, the home continues to be exempt as a resource so long as the spouse, minor child, or child who is blind or permanently disabled lives there (regardless of whether the absence is temporary).

(G) Once a lien has been filed against the property of an NF resident, the property is no longer considered as a countable resource.

(b) Promissory notes, loans, or mortgages. The rules regarding the treatment of funds used to purchase a promissory note, loan, or mortgage on or after February 8, 2006, are found in (1) through (2) of this subsection.

(1) Funds used to purchase a promissory note, loan, or mortgage on or after February 8, 2006, are treated as assets transferred, and the value of such note, loan, or mortgage shall be the amount of the outstanding balance due on the note, loan, or mortgage as of the date of the individual's application for medical assistance unless the note, loan, or mortgage meets all of the conditions in paragraphs (A) through (C) of this paragraph.

(A) The note, loan, or mortgage has a repayment term that is actuarially sound (as determined in accordance with actuarial publications of the Office of the Chief Actuary of the United States Social Security Administration).

(B) The note, loan, or mortgage provides for payments to be made in equal amounts during the term of the loan, with no deferral and no balloon payments made.

(C) The note, loan, or mortgage prohibits the cancellation of the balance upon the death of the lender.

(2) Funds used to purchase a promissory note, loan, or mortgage for less than its fair market value are treated as assets transferred for less than fair market value regardless of whether:

(A) The note, loan, or mortgage was purchased before February 8, 2006; or

(B) The note, loan, or mortgage was purchased on or after February 8, 2006, and the conditions described in paragraph (1) of this subsection were met.

(c) Annuities. Treatment of annuities purchased on or after February 8, 2006.

(1) The purchase of an annuity shall be treated as the disposal of an asset for less than fair market value unless the Oklahoma Health Care Authority is named as the remainder beneficiary

(A) in the first position for at least the total amount of medical assistance paid on behalf of the institutionalized individual; or

(B) in the second position after the community spouse, child under 21 years of age, or disabled child and is named in the first position if the spouse or a representative of the child disposes of any such remainder for less than fair market value.

(2) For purposes of determining financial eligibility for long-term care services under this chapter, the term A assets @ shall include an annuity purchased by or on behalf of an annuitant who has applied for SoonerCare nursing facility services or other long-term care services unless the annuity meets one of the following conditions. 

(A) The annuity is an annuity described in subsection (b) or (q) of Section 408 of the United States Internal Revenue Code of 1986; or

(B) The annuity is purchased with proceeds from:

(i) An account or trust described in subsection (a), (c), or (p) of Section 408 of the United States Internal Revenue Code of 1986;

(ii) A simplified employee pension as defined in Section 408(k) of the United States Internal Revenue Service Code of 1986;

(iii) A Roth IRA described in Section 408A of the United States Internal Revenue Service Code of 1986; or

(C) The annuity:

(i) is irrevocable and nonassignable;

(ii) is actuarially sound as determined in accordance with actuarial publications of the Office of the Chief Actuary of the United States Social Security Administration; and

(iii) provides for payments in equal amounts during the term of the annuity, with no deferral and no balloon payments made.

(d) Life Estates. This subsection pertains to the purchase of a life estate in another individual's home.

(1) The entire amount used to purchase a life estate in another individual's home on or after February 8, 2006, is treated as assets transferred for less than fair market value, unless the purchaser resides in the home for at least one year after the date of the purchase.

(2) Funds used to purchase a life estate in another individual's home for less than its fair market value are treated as assets transferred for less than fair market value regardless of whether:

(A) The life estate was purchased before February 8, 2006; or

(B) The life estate was purchased on or after February, 8, 2006, and the purchaser resided in the home for one year after the date of purchase.

(e) Oklahoma Long-Term Care Partnership (LTCP) Program.   This subsection pertains to individuals with Oklahoma Long-Term Care Partnership policies. The Oklahoma Insurance Department approves long-term care insurance policies as Long-term Care Partnership Program policies. The face page of the policy document will indicate if the insurance qualifies as a Long-Term Care Partnership Program policy.

(1) Benefits from the LTCP policy must be exhausted before the individual can be eligible for long-term care under the SoonerCare program.

(2) Assets in an amount equal to the amount paid out under the LTCP policy can be protected for the insured individual once the LTCP policy benefits are exhausted. Protected assets are disregarded when determining eligibility for the SoonerCare program per 317:35-5-41.9(26). A record of the amount paid on behalf of the policy holder is available through the OHCA or insurance company holding the LTCP policy.

(A) At the time of application for SoonerCare the individual must determine the asset(s) to be protected. The protected asset(s) cannot be changed. If the value of the protected asset(s) decreases, the individual does not have the option to select additional assets to bring the total up to the protected amount. 

(B) If the protected asset(s) are income-producing, the income earned while on SoonerCare is counted in accordance with 317:35-5-42.

(C) The individual can choose to transfer the protected asset without incurring a transfer of assets penalty.

(D) When determining resource eligibility for a couple when one of them enters the nursing home or applies for a HCBS waiver, the LTCP protected asset(s) are disregarded in determining the total amount of the couple's resources.

 

317:35-5-41.9.Resource disregards

[Revised 06-25-11]
In determining need, the following are not considered as resources:
(1) The coupon allotment under the Food Stamp Act of 1977;
(2) Any payment received under Title II of the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970;
(3) Education grants (excluding Work Study) scholarships, etc., that are contingent upon the student regularly attending school. The student's classification (graduate or undergraduate) is not a factor;
(4) Loans (regardless of use) if a bona fide debt or obligation to pay can be established. Criteria to establish a loan as bona fide includes:
(A) An acknowledgment of obligation to repay or evidence that the loan was from an individual or financial institution in the loan business. If the loan agreement is not written, an OKDHS Loan Verification form is completed by the borrower attesting that the loan is bona fide and signed by the lender verifying the date and amount of loan. When copies of written agreements or OKDHS Loan Verification form are not available, detailed case documentation must include information that the loan is bona fide and how the debt amount and date of receipt was verified;
(B) If the loan was from a person(s) not in the loan business, the borrower's acknowledgment of obligation to repay (with or without interest) and the lender's verification of the loan are required to indicate that the loan is bona fide;
(C) Proceeds of a loan secured by an exempt asset are not an asset;
(5) Indian payments or items purchased from Indian payments (including judgment funds or funds held in trust) distributed by the Secretary of the Interior (BIA) or distributed by the tribe subject to approval by the Secretary of the Interior. Also, any interest or investment income accrued on such funds while held in trust or any purchases made with judgment funds, trust funds, interest or investment income accrued on such funds. Any income from mineral leases, from tribal business investments, etc. However, any interest or income derived from the principal or produced by purchases made with the funds after distribution is considered as any other income. Funds and property held in Individual Indian Money (IIM) Accounts are treated as a converted resource and disregarded for purposes of eligibility. Disbursements of funds from IIM accounts are to be disregarded as a resource in the month in which the disbursement was made. However, any retained disbursed funds are counted as a resource for purposes of eligibility on the first of the month following the month of disbursement;
(6) Special allowance for school expenses made available upon petitions (in writing) from funds held in trust for the student;
(7) Benefits from State and Community Programs on Aging (Title III) are disregarded. Income from the Older American Community Service Employment Act (Title V), including AARP and Green Thumb organizations as well as employment positions allocated at the discretion of the Governor of Oklahoma, is counted as earned income. Both Title III and Title V are under the Older Americans Act of 1965 amended by PL 100-175 to become the Older Americans Act amendments of 1987;
(8) Payments for supportive services or reimbursement of out-of-pocket expenses made to individual volunteers serving as foster grandparents, senior health aides, or senior companions, and to persons serving in the Services Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE) and Active Corps of Executives (ACE);
(9) Payment to volunteers under the Domestic Volunteer Services Act of 1973 (VISTA), unless the gross amount of VISTA payments equals or exceeds the state or federal minimum wage, whichever is greater;
(10) The value of supplemental food assistance received under the Child Nutrition Act or the special food services program for children under the National School Lunch Act;
(11) Any portion of payments made under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act to an Alaska Native which are exempt from taxation under the Settlement Act;
(12) Experimental Housing Allowance Program (EHAP) payments made under Annual Contributions Contracts entered into prior to January 1, 1975, under Section 23 of the U.S. Housing Act of 1937, as amended;
(13) Payments made from the Agent Orange Settlement Fund or any other fund established pursuant to the settlement in the In Re Agent Orange product liability litigation, M.D.L. No. 381 (E.D.N.Y.);
(14) Payments made from the Radiation Exposure Compensation Trust Fund as compensation for injuries or deaths resulting from the exposure to radiation from nuclear testing and uranium mining;
(15) Federal major disaster and emergency assistance provided under the Disaster Relief Act of 1974, and comparable disaster assistance provided by States, local governments and disaster assistance organizations;
(16) Interests of individual Indians in trust or restricted lands;
(17) Resources set aside under an approved Plan for Achieving Self-Support for Blind or Disabled People (PASS). The Social Security Administration approves the plan, the amount of resources excluded and the period of time approved. A plan can be approved for an initial period of 18 months. The plan may be extended for an additional 18 months if needed, and an additional 12 months (total 48 months) when the objective involves a lengthy educational or training program;
(18) Payments made to individuals because of their status as victims of Nazi persecution (PL 103-286);
(19) A migratory farm worker's out-of-state homestead is disregarded if the farm worker's intent is to return to the homestead after the temporary absence;
(20) Payments received under the Civil Liberties Act of 1988. These payments are to be made to individuals of Japanese ancestry who were detained in internment camps during World War II;
(21) Dedicated bank accounts established by representative payees to receive and maintain retroactive SSI benefits for disabled/blind children up to the legal age of 18. The dedicated bank account must be in a financial institution, the sole purpose of which is to receive and maintain SSI underpayments which are required or allowed to be deposited into such an account. The account must be set up and verification provided to SSA before the underpayment can be released;
(22) Payments received as a result of participation in a class action lawsuit entitled "Factor VIII or IX Concentrate Blood Products Litigation". These payments are made to hemophilia patients who are infected with HIV. Payments are not considered as income or resources. A penalty cannot be assessed against the individual if he/she disposes of part or all of the payment. The rules at OAC 317:35-5-41.6 regarding the availability of a trust do not apply if an individual establishes a trust using the settlement payment;
(23) Payments made to certain Vietnam veterans' children with spina bifida (PL 104-204);
(24) Payments made to certain Korea service veterans' children with spina bifida (PL 108-183);
(25) Payments made to the children of women Vietnam veterans who suffer from certain birth defects (PL 106-419);
(26) For individuals with an Oklahoma Long-Term Care Partnership Program approved policy, resources equal to the amount of benefits paid on the insured's behalf by the long-term care insurer are disregarded at the time of application for long-term care services provided by SoonerCare. The Oklahoma Insurance Department approves policies as Long-term Care Partnership Program policies;
(27) Workers' Compensation Medicare Set Aside Arrangements (WCMSAs), which allocate a portion of the workers' compensation settlement for future medical expenses; and
(28) Additional payments of regular unemployment compensation in the amount of $25 per week ending June 30, 2010 and any amount of emergency unemployment compensation paid through May 31, 2010, as authorized under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Tax Act of 2009. 

317:35-5-41.10.Changes in capital resources
[Revised 06-25-09]
(a) Capital resources of an applicant or member currently receiving assistance. If the resource(s) of an applicant is in a form which is not available for immediate use, such as real estate, mineral rights, or one of many other forms, and the applicant is trying to make the resource available, the applicant may be certified and given a reasonable amount of time to make this available. If a member who is currently receiving medical assistance acquires resources which increase his/her available resources at an amount above the maximum resource standard, he/she is given a reasonable amount of time to make the resources available. A reasonable amount of time would normally not exceed 90 days. The member is notified in writing that a period of time not to exceed 90 days will be given to make the resource available. Any extension beyond the initial 90 day period is justified only after interviewing the member, determining that a good faith effort is still being made and that failure to make the resource available is due to circumstances beyond the control of the member.
(b) Money borrowed on member's resources. Money borrowed on any of the member's resources, except the home, merely changes his/her resource from one form to another. Money borrowed on the home is evaluated in relation to the maximum reserve standard.
(c) Transfer of resources. Rules on transfer or disposal of capital resources are not applicable unless the individual enters a nursing home or receives Home and Community Based Waiver Services, HCBWS/MR or ADvantage waiver services. [See OAC 317:35-9, OAC 317:35-17, and OAC 317:35-19]
317:35-5-41.11.Maximum resources
[Issued 08-01-07]
Maximum resources is a term used to designate the largest amount which a member can have in one or more nonexempt resources, and still be considered to be in need. A member's resources may be held in any form or combination of forms. If the resources of the applicant or member exceed the maximums listed on OKDHS Appendix C-1, he/she is not eligible.
(1) For each minor blind or disabled child up to the age of 18 living with parent(s) whose needs are not included in a TANF grant, or receiving SSI and/or SSP, the resource limit is the same as the individual limit as shown on OKDHS Appendix C-1. If the parent's resources exceed the maximum amount, the excess is deemed available to the child (resources of an ineligible child are not deemed to an eligible child). If there is more than one eligible child, the amount is prorated.
(2) If the minor blind or disabled child:
(A) is residing in a nursing facility, or a medical facility if the confinement lasts or is expected to last for 30 days, the parent(s)' resources are not deemed to the child; or
(B) under age 19 is eligible for TEFRA, the parent's(s') resources are not deemed to the child.
(3) Premature infants (i.e., 37 weeks or less) whose birth weight is less than 1200 grams (approximately 2 pounds 10 ounces) will be considered disabled by SSA even if no other medical impairment(s) exist. In this event, the parents' resources are not deemed to the child until the month following the month in which the child leaves the hospital and begins living with his/her parents.
(4) When both parents are in the home and one parent is included in an aged, blind or disabled case and the spouse is included in an TANF case with the children, the resources of both parents are evaluated in relation to eligibility for SSI and therefore not considered on the AFDC case. All resources of the parents would be shown on the aged, blind or disabled case.

317:35-5-42.Determination of countable income for individuals categorically related to aged, blind and disabled

[Revised 02-27-18]
(a) General. The term income is defined as that gross gain or gross recurrent benefit which is derived from labor, business, property, retirement and other benefits, and many other forms which can be counted on as currently available for use on a regular basis. When an individual's income is reduced due to recoupment of an overpayment or garnishment, the gross amount before the recoupment or garnishment is counted as income. Verification of the member's countable income or resources held in bank accounts or at other financial institutions can be established through an Asset Verification System (AVS).

(1) If it appears the applicant or SoonerCare member is eligible for any type of income (excluding SSI) or resources, he/she must be notified in writing by the Agency of his/her potential eligibility. The notice must contain the information that failure to file for and take all appropriate steps to obtain such benefit within 30 days from the date of the notice will result in a determination of ineligibility.

(2) If a husband and wife are living in their own home, the couple's total income and/or resource is divided equally between the two cases. If they both enter a nursing facility, their income and resources are considered separately.

(3) If only one spouse in a couple is eligible and the couple ceases to live together, only the income and resources of the ineligible spouse that are actually contributed to the eligible spouse beginning with the month after the month which they ceased to live together are considered.

(4) In calculating monthly income, cents are included in the computationuntilthe monthly amount of each individual's source of income has been established. When the monthly amount of each income source has been established, cents are rounded to the nearest dollar (1 - 49 cents is rounded down, and 50 - 99 cents is rounded up). For example, an individual's weekly earnings of $99.90 are multiplied by 4.3 and the cents rounded to the nearest dollar ($99.90 x 4.3 = $429.57 rounds to $430). See rounding procedures in OAC 340:65-3-4 when using BENDEX to verify OASDI benefits.

(b) Income disregards. In determining need, the following are not

considered as income:

(1) The value of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (food stamps) received;

(2) Any payment received under Title II of the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970;

(3) Educational grants (excluding work study), scholarships, etc., that are contingent upon the student regularly attending school. The student's classification (graduate or undergraduate) is not a factor;

(4) Loans (regardless of use) if a bona fide debt or obligation to pay can be established. Criteria to establish a loan as bona fide includes:

(A) An acknowledgment of obligation to repay or evidence that the loan was from an individual or financial institution in the loan business. If the loan agreement is not written, an OKDHS Form 08AD103E, Loan Verification, should be completed by the borrower attesting that the loan is bona fide and signed by the lender verifying the date and amount of loan. When copies of written agreements or OKDHS Form 08AD103E are not available, detailed case documentation must include information that the loan is bona fide and how the debt amount and date of receipt was verified.

(B) If the loan was from a person(s) not in the loan business, the borrower's acknowledgment of obligation to repay (with or without interest) and the lender's verification of the loan are required to indicate that the loan is bona fide.

(C) Proceeds of a loan secured by an exempt asset are not an asset;

(5) One-third of child support payments received on behalf of the disabled minor child;

(6) Indian payments (including judgment funds or funds held in trust) distributed by the Secretary of the Interior (BIA) or distributed by the tribe subject to approval by the Secretary of the Interior. Also, any interest or investment income accrued on such funds while held in trust or any purchases made with judgment funds, trust funds, interest or investment income accrued on such funds. Any income from mineral leases, from tribal business investments, etc. However, any interest or income derived from the principal or produced by purchases made with funds after distribution is considered as any other income;

(7) Special allowance for school expenses made available upon petition (in writing) for funds held in trust for the student;

(8) Title III benefits from State and Community Programs on Aging;

(9) Payment for supportive services or reimbursement of out-of-pocket expenses made to individual volunteers serving as foster grandparents, senior health aides, or senior companions, and to persons serving in the Service Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE) and Active Corps of Executives (ACE);

(10) Payments to volunteers under the Domestic Volunteer Services Act of 1973 (VISTA), unless the gross amount of VISTA payments equals or exceeds the state or federal minimum wage, whichever is greater;

(11) The value of supplemental food assistance received under the Child Nutrition Act or the special food service program for children under the National School Lunch Act;

(12) Any portion of payments made under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act to an Alaska Native which are exempt from taxation under the Settlement Act;

(13) Reimbursements from an employer for out-of-pocket expenditures and allowances for travel or training to the extent the funds are used for expenses directly related to such travel or training and uniform allowance if the uniform is uniquely identified with company names or logo;

(14) Assistance or services from the Vocational Rehabilitation program such as transportation expenses to a rehabilitation center, extra clothing, lunches, grooming needed for a training program and any other such complementary payments;

(15) Experimental Housing Allowance Program (EHAP) payments made under Annual Contributions Contracts entered into prior to January 1, 1975, under Section 23 of the U.S. Housing Act of 1937, as amended;

(16) Payments made by a public or private non-profit child care agency for a child placed in foster care or subsidized adoption;

(17) Governmental rental or housing subsidies by governmental agencies, e.g., HUD (received in-kind or in cash) for rent, mortgage payments, or utilities;

(18) LIHEAP payments for energy assistance and payments for emergency situations under Emergency Assistance to Needy Families with Children;

(19) Payments made from the Agent Orange Settlement Fund or any other fund established pursuant to the settlement in the In Re Agent Orange product liability litigation, M.D.L. No. 381 (E.D.N.Y.);

(20) Payments made from the Radiation Exposure Compensation Trust Fund as compensation for injuries or deaths resulting from the exposure to radiation from nuclear testing and uranium mining;

(21) Federal major disaster and emergency assistance provided under the Disaster Relief Act of 1974, and comparable disaster assistance provided by States, local governments, and disaster assistance organizations;

(22) Income of a sponsor to the sponsored eligible alien;

(23) Income that is set aside under an approved Plan for Achieving Self-Support for Blind or Disabled People (PASS). The Social Security Administration approves the plan, the amount of income excluded and the period of time approved. A plan can be approved for an initial period of 18 months. The plan may be extended for an additional 18 months if needed, and an additional 12 months (total 48 months) when the objective involves a lengthy educational or training program;

(24) Payments made to individuals because of their status as victims of Nazi persecution (PL 103-286);

(25) Payments received under the Civil Liberties Act of 1988. These payments are to be made to individuals of Japanese ancestry who were detained in internment camps during World War II;

(26) Payments received as a result of participation in a class action lawsuit entitled "Factor VIII or IX Concentrate Blood Products Litigation". These payments are made to hemophilia patients who are infected with HIV. However, if the payments are placed in an interest-bearing account, or some other investment medium that produces income, the income generated by the account may be countable as income to the individual;

(27) Payments made to certain Vietnam veterans' children with spina bifida (PL 104-204);

(28) Payments made to certain Korea service veterans' children with spina bifida (PL 108-183);

(29) Payments made to the children of women Vietnam veterans who suffer from certain birth defects (PL 106-419);

(30) Additional payments of regular unemployment compensation in the amount of $25 per week ending June 30, 2010, and any amount of emergency unemployment compensation paid through May 31, 2010, as authorized under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Tax Act of 2009;

(31) Wages paid by the Census Bureau for temporary employment related to Census activities;

(32) Income tax refunds;

(33) Home energy assistance;

(34) Food or shelter based on need provided by nonprofit agencies;

(35) Money someone else spends to pay your expenses for items other than food or shelter (e.g., someone pays for your telephone or medical bills);

(36) Earned income for working students younger than 22 years of age when they regularly attend a school, college, university or a course of vocational or technical training. Refer to Appendix C-1, Schedule VIII.E; Maximum Income, Resource and Payment Standards for the maximum monthly and yearly exclusion amounts;

(37) The cost of impairment-related work expenses for items or services that a disabled person needs in order to work; and

(38) The first $2,000 of compensation received per calendar year for participating in certain clinical trials.

(c) Determination of income. The member is responsible for reporting information regarding all sources of available income. This information is verified and used by the worker in determining eligibility.

(1) Gross income is listed for purposes of determining eligibility. It may be derived from many sources, and some items may be automatically disregarded by the computer when so provided by state or federal law.

(2) If a member is determined to be categorically needy and is also an SSI recipient, any change in countable income (see OAC 317:35-5-42(d)(3) to determine countable income) will not affect receipt of SoonerCare and amount of State Supplemental Payment (SSP) as long as the amount does not cause SSI ineligibility. Income which will be considered by SSI in the retrospective cycle is documented in the case with computer update at the time that SSI makes the change (in order not to penalize the member twice). If the SSI change is not timely, the worker updates the computer using the appropriate date as if it had been timely. If the receipt of the income causes SSI ineligibility, the income is considered immediately with proper action taken to reduce or close the SoonerCare benefit and SSP case. Any SSI overpayment caused by SSA not making timely changes will result in recovery by SSI in the future. When the worker becomes aware of income changes which will affect SSI eligibility or payment amount, the information is to be shared with the SSA office.

(3) Some of the more common income sources to be considered in determining eligibility are as follows:

(A) Retirement and disability benefits. These include but are not limited to OASDI, VA, Railroad Retirement, SSI, and unemployment benefits. Federal and State benefits are considered for the month they are intended when determining eligibility.

(i) Verifying and documenting the receipt of the benefit and the current benefit amount are achieved by:

(I) seeing the member's award letter or warrant;

(II) obtaining a signed statement from the individual who cashed the warrant; or

(III) by using BENDEX and SDX.

(ii) Determination of OASDI benefits to be considered (disregarding COLA's) for former State Supplemental recipients who are reapplying for medical benefits under the Pickle Amendment must be computed according to OKDHS Form 08AX011E.

(iii) The Veterans Administration allows their recipients the opportunity to request a reimbursement for medical expenses not covered by SoonerCare. If a recipient is eligible for the readjustment payment, it is paid in a lump sum for the entire past year. This reimbursement is disregarded as income and a resource in the month it is received; however, any amount retained in the month following receipt is considered a resource.

(iv) Government financial assistance in the form of VA Aid and Attendance or Champus payments is considered as follows:

(I) Nursing facility care. VA Aid and Attendance or Champus payment whether paid directly to the member or to the facility, are considered as third party resources and do not affect the income eligibility or the vendor payment of the member.

(II) Own home care. The actual amount of VA Aid and Attendance payment paid for an attendant in the home is disregarded as income. In all instances, the amount of VA Aid and Attendance is shown on the computer form.

(v) Veterans or their surviving spouse who receive a VA pension may have their pension reduced to $90 by the VA if the veteran does not have dependents, is SoonerCare eligible, and is residing in a nursing facility that is approved under SoonerCare. Section 8003 of Public Law 101-508 allows these veterans' pensions to be reduced to $90 per month. None of the $90 may be used in computing any vendor payment or spenddown. In these instances, the nursing home resident is entitled to the $90 reduced VA pension as well as the regular nursing facility maintenance standard. Any vendor payment or spenddown will be computed by using other income minus the monthly nursing facility maintenance standard minus any applicable medical deduction(s). Veterans or their surviving spouse who meet these conditions will have their VA benefits reduced the month following the month of admission to a SoonerCare approved nursing facility.

(B) SSI benefits. SSI benefits may be continued up to three months for a recipient who enters a public medical or psychiatric institution, a SoonerCare approved hospital, extended care facility, intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded or nursing facility. To be eligible for the continuation of benefits, the SSI recipient must have a physician's certification that the institutionalization is not expected to exceed three months and there must be a need to maintain and provide expenses for the home. These continued payments are intended for the use of the recipient and do not affect the vendor payment.

(C) Lump sum payments.

(i) Any income received in a lump sum (with the exception of SSI lump sum) covering a period of more than one month, whether received on a recurring or nonrecurring basis, is considered as income in the month it is received. Any amount from any lump sum source, including SSI (with the exception of dedicated bank accounts for disabled/blind children under age 18), retained on the first day of the next month is considered as a resource. Such lump sum payments may include, but are not limited to, accumulation of wages, retroactive OASDI, VA benefits, Workers' Compensation, bonus lease payments and annual rentals from land and/or minerals.

(ii) Lump sum payments used to establish dedicated bank accounts by representative payees in order to receive and maintain retroactive SSI benefits for disabled/blind children under age 18 are excluded as income. The interest income generated from dedicated bank accounts is also excluded. The dedicated bank account consisting of the retroactive SSI lump sum payment and accumulated interest is excluded as a resource in both the month received and any subsequent months.

(iii) A life insurance death benefit received by an individual while living is considered as income in the month received and as a resource in the following months to the extent it is available.

(iv) Changing a resource from one form to another, such as converting personal property to cash, is not considered a lump sum payment.

(D) Income from capital resources and rental property. Income from capital resources can be derived from rental of a house, rental from land (cash or crop rent), leasing of minerals, life estate, homestead rights or interest.

(i) If royalty income is received monthly but in irregular amounts, an average based on the previous six months' royalty income is computed and used to determine income eligibility. When the difference between the gross and net income represents a production or severance tax (e.g., most oil royalties are reduced by this tax), the OHCA only uses the net figure when determining income eligibility. The production or severance tax is the cost of producing the income, and, therefore, is deducted from the gross income. Exception: At any time that the county becomes aware of and can establish a trend showing a dramatic increase or decrease in royalty income, the previous two months' royalty income is averaged to compute countable monthly income.

(ii) Rental income may be treated as earned income when the individual participates in the management of a trade or business or invests his/her own labor in producing the income. The individual's federal income tax return will verify whether or not the income is from self-employment. Otherwise, income received from rental property is treated as unearned income.

(iii) When rental property is handled by a leasing agent who collects the rent and deducts a management fee, only the rent actually received by the member is considered as income.

(E) Earned income/self-employment. The term "earned income" includes income in cash earned by an individual through the receipt of wages, salary, commission, or profit from activities in which he/she is engaged as a self-employed individual or as an employee. See subparagraph (G) of this paragraph for earnings received in fluctuating amounts. "Earned Income" is also defined to include in-kind benefits received by an employee from an employer in lieu of wages or in conjunction with wages. Such benefits received in-kind are considered as earned income only when the employee/employer relationship has been established. The cash value of the in-kind benefits must be verified by the employer. Income from self-employment also includes in-kind benefits for a work activity or service for which the self-employed person ordinarily receives payment in his/her business enterprise. An exchange of labor or services, e.g., barter, is considered as an in-kind benefit. Medical insurance secured through the employer, whether purchased or as a benefit, is not considered in-kind but is recorded on the case computer input document for coordination with SoonerCare benefits.

(i) Work study received by an individual who is attending school is considered as earned income with appropriate earned income disregards applied.

(ii) Money from the sale of whole blood or blood plasma is considered as self-employment income subject to necessary business expenses and appropriate earned income disregards.

(iii) Self-employment income is determined as follows:

(I) Generally, the federal or state income tax form for the most recent year is used for calculating the self-employment income to project income on a monthly basis for the certification period. The gross income amount, as well as the allowable deductions, are the same as can be claimed under the Internal Revenue code for tax purposes.

(II) Self-employment income which represents a household's annual support is prorated over a 12- month period, even if the income is received in a short period of time. For example, self-employment income received by crop farmers is averaged over a 12-month period if the income represents the farmer's annual support.

(III) If the household's self-employment enterprise has been in existence for less than a year, the income from that self-employment enterprise is averaged over the period of time the business has been in operation to establish the monthly income amount.

(IV) If a tax return is not available because one has not been filed due to recent establishment of the self-employment enterprise, a profit and loss statement must be seen to establish the monthly income amount.

(V) The purchase price and/or payment(s) on the principal of loans for capital assets, equipment, machinery, and other durable goods is not considered as a cost of producing self-employed income. Also not considered are net losses from previous periods, depreciation of capital assets, equipment, machinery, and other durable goods; and federal, state and local income taxes, FICA, money set aside for retirement purposes, and other work related personal expenses, such as meals and necessary transportation (these expenses are accounted for by the work related expense deduction given in OAC 340:10-3-33(1)).

(iv) Countable self-employment income is determined by deducting allowable business expenses to determine the adjusted gross income. The earned income deductions are then applied to establish countable earned income.

(F) Infrequent or irregular income.

(i) Income is considered to be infrequent if the individual receives it only once during a calendar quarter from a single source and the individual did not receive that type of income in the month preceding or following the month the income was received.

(ii) Income is considered to be irregular if the individual cannot reasonably expect to receive it.

(iii) OHCA excludes the following amount of infrequent or irregular income:

(I) the first $30 per calendar quarter of earned income; and

(II) the first $60 per calendar quarter of unearned income.

(iv) Infrequent or irregular income, whether earned or unearned, that exceeds these amounts is considered countable income in the month it is received.

(G) Monthly income received in fluctuating amounts. Income which is received monthly but in irregular amounts is averaged using two months' income, if possible, to determine income eligibility. Less than two months' income may be used when circumstances (e.g., new employment, unpaid sick leave, etc.) would indicate that previous income amounts would not be appropriate to use in determining future income amounts. Income received more often than monthly is converted to monthly amounts as follows:

(i) Daily. Income received on a daily basis is converted to a weekly amount then multiplied by 4.3.

(ii) Weekly. Income received weekly is multiplied by 4.3.

(iii) Twice a month. Income received twice a month is multiplied by 2.

(iv) Biweekly. Income received every two weeks is multiplied by 2.15.

(H) Non-negotiable notes and mortgages. Installment payments received on a note, mortgage, etc., are considered as monthly income.

(I) Income from the Job Training and Partnership Act (JTPA). Unearned income received by an adult, such as a needs based payment, cash assistance, compensation in lieu of wages, allowances, etc., from a program funded by JTPA is considered as any other unearned income. JTPA earned income received as wages is considered as any other earned income.

(J) Other income. Any other monies or payments which are available for current living expenses must be considered.

(d) Computation of income.

(1) Earned income or unearned income. The general income exclusion of $20 per month is allowed for earned or unearned income, unless the unearned income is SSP, on the combined income of the eligible individual and eligible or ineligible spouse. See paragraph (5) of this subsection if there are ineligible minor children. After the $20 exclusion, deduct $65 and one-half of the remaining combined earned income. The total gross amount of unearned income of the eligible individual and eligible or ineligible spouse is considered.

(2) Countable income. The countable income is the sum of the earned income and the total gross unearned income after exclusions.

(3) Deeming computation for disabled or blind minor child(ren). An automated calculation is available for computing the income amount to be deemed from parent(s) and the spouse of the parent to eligible disabled or blind minor child(ren) by use of transaction CID. The ineligible minor child in the computation regarding allocation for ineligible child(ren) is defined as: a dependent child under age 18.

(A) An intellectually disabled child living in the home who is ineligible for SSP due to the deeming process may be approved for SoonerCare under the Home and Community Based Services Waiver (HCBS) Program as outlined in OAC 317:35-9- 5.

(B) For TEFRA, the income of child's parent(s) is not deemed to him/her.

(4) Premature infants. Premature infants (i.e., 37 weeks or less) whose birth weight is less than 1200 grams (approximately 2 pounds 10 ounces) will be considered disabled by SSA even if no other medical impairment(s) exist. In this event, the parents' income is not deemed to the child until the month following the month in which the child leaves the hospital and begins living with his/her parents.

(5) Procedures for deducting ineligible minor child allocation. When an eligible individual has an ineligible spouse and ineligible minor children (not receiving TANF), the computation is as follows:

(A) Each ineligible child's allocation (OKDHS Form 08AX001E, Schedule VII. C.) minus each child's gross countable income is deducted from the ineligible spouse's income. Deeming of income is not done from child to parent.

(B) The deduction in subparagraph (A) of this paragraph is prior to deduction of the general income exclusion and work expense.

(C) After computations in subparagraphs (A) and (B) of this paragraph, the remaining amount is the ineligible spouse's countable income considered available to the eligible spouse.

(6) Special exclusions for blind individuals. Any blind individual who is employed may deduct the general income exclusion and the work exclusion from the gross amount of earned income. After the application of these exclusions, one-half of the remaining income is excluded. The actual work expense is then deducted from the remaining half to arrive at the amount of countable income. If this blind individual has a spouse who is also eligible due to blindness and both are working, the amount of ordinary and necessary expenses attributable to the earning of income for each of the blind individuals may be deducted. Expenses are deductible as paid but may not exceed the amount of earned income. To be deductible, an expense need not relate directly to the blindness of the individual, it need only be an ordinary and necessary work expense of the blind individual. Such expenses fall into three broad categories:

(A) transportation to and from work;

(B) job performance; and

(C) job improvement.

 

 

317:35-5-43.Third party resources; insurance, workers' compensation and Medicare

[Revised 09-24-13] 
Federal Regulations require that all reasonable measures to ascertain legal liability of third parties to pay for care and services be taken. In instances where such liability is found to exist after SoonerCare has been made available, reimbursement to the extent of such legal liability must be sought. The applicant or member must fully disclose to OHCA that another resource may be available to pay for care. If OKDHS obtains information regarding other available resources from a third party, the worker must complete OKDHS Form 08AD050E, and submit to OHCA, Third Party Liability Unit. Certification or payment in behalf of an eligible individual may not be withheld because of the liability of a third party when such liability or the amount cannot be currently established or is not currently available to pay the individual's medical expense. The rules in this Section also apply when an individual categorically related to pregnancy-related services plans to put the child up for adoption. Any agreement with an adoption agency or attorneys shall include payment of medical care and must be considered as a possibly liable third party, regardless of whether agreement is made during prenatal, delivery or postpartum periods.
(1) Insurance.
(A) Private insurance. An individual requesting SoonerCare is responsible for identifying and providing information on any private medical insurance. He/she is also responsible for reporting subsequent changes in insurance coverage.
(B) Government benefits. Individuals requesting SoonerCare who are also eligible for Civilian Health and Medical Programs for Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS), must disclose that the coverage is available. They are considered a third party liability source.
(2) Workers' Compensation. An applicant for SoonerCare or a SoonerCare member that requires medical care because of a work injury or occupational disease must notify OHCA/TPL immediately and assist OHCA in ascertaining the facts related to the injury or disease (such as date, details of the accident, etc.). The OHCA periodically matches data with the Worker's Compensation Court on all cases under its jurisdiction. When any information regarding an applicant for SoonerCare or a SoonerCare member is obtained, the member must assist OHCA with the subrogation claim with the employer/insurer. 
(3) Third party liability (accident or injury). When medical services are required for an applicant of SoonerCare or a SoonerCare member as the result of an accident or injury known to the worker, the member is responsible for reporting to OHCA/TPL the persons involved in the accident, date and details of the accident and possible insurance benefits which might be made available. If an automobile accident involves more than one car it is necessary to report liability insurance on all cars involved.
(A) If OKDHS receives information regarding a SoonerCare member or applicant seeking medical services due to an accident, the worker submits any information available to OHCA/TPL.
(B) If OHCA receives a claim for payment from SoonerCare funds and the diagnosis indicates the need for services may have resulted from an accident or injury involving third party liability, OHCA will attempt to contact the member to obtain details of the incident. If additional contact is necessary with the member, the local OKDHS office or OHCA representative may be requested by the OHCA/TPL Unit to submit the appropriate information.
(4) Medicare eligibility. If it appears the applicant may be eligible for Medicare but does not have a Medicare card or other verification, the information is cleared with the Social Security Office and the findings entered with the date of the verification in the record. If the applicant did not enroll for Part A or Part B at the time he/she became eligible for Medicare and is now subject to pay an escalated premium for Medicare enrollment, he/she is required to do so. Payment can be made for services within the scope of SoonerCare.
(5) Absent parent.
(A) Applicants are required to cooperate with the Oklahoma Department of Human Services Oklahoma Child Support Services (OCSS) in the assignment of child/spousal support rights. The families involved are those with a minor child(ren) in the home. The child(ren) must be related to the children's, the blind, or the disabled groups and have a parent(s) absent from the home. Any support collected on behalf of these families will be paid to them as if they were receiving non-public assistance child support services, with one exception. The exception is regarding child support collected for foster care child(ren) in OKDHS temporary custody. This support is paid to OKDHS Children and Family Services Division (CFSD). The child support income continues to be counted in determining SoonerCare eligibility if it is counted under the financial eligibility methodology used for the group for which eligibility is being determined. The rules in OAC 317:35-10 are used, with the following exceptions:
(i) In the event the family already has an existing child support case, the only action required is a memo to the appropriate OCSS district office notifying them of the certification.
(ii) Prior to October 1, 2013, child/spousal support is always counted as income less any applicable income disregard. This income inclusion applies whether it is redirected to the CFSD or retained by the member. Effective October 1, 2013, see rules regarding financial eligibility for the individual's eligibility group to determine whether child/spousal support is counted as income.
(iii) Children who are in custody of OKDHS may be exempt from referral to OCSS. Should the pursuit of the OCSS services be determined to be detrimental to the OKDHS CFSD service plan, an exemption may be approved.
(B) Cash medical support may be ordered to be paid to the OHCA by the non-custodial parent if there is no access to health insurance at a reasonable cost or if the health insurance is determined not accessible to the child according to OCSS Rules. Reasonable is deemed to be 5% or less of the non-custodial parent's gross income. The administration and collection of cash medical support will be determined by OKDHS OCSS and will be based on the income guidelines and rules that are applicable at the time. However, at no time will the non-custodial parent be required to pay more than 5% of his/her gross income for cash medical support unless payment in excess of 5% is ordered by the Court. The disbursement and hierarchy of payments will be determined pursuant to OKDHS/OCSS guidelines.

317:35-5-44.Child/spousal support

[Revised 09-24-13] 
The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 requires the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to provide Child Support Services to certain families receiving SoonerCare benefits through the Oklahoma Child Support Services Division (OCSS). The families are required to cooperate in assignment of medical support rights. These families will not be required to cooperate with the OCSS in the assignment of child/spousal support rights. The families involved are those with a minor child(ren) in the home. The child(ren) must be related to the children's, the blind or the disabled groups and have a parent(s) absent from the home. Any support collected on behalf of these families will be paid to them as if they were receiving non-public assistance child support services, with one exception. The exception is regarding child support collected for foster care child(ren) in OKDHS temporary custody. This support is paid to OKDHS Children and Family Services Division (CFSD). The rules in OAC 317:10 are used, with the following exceptions:
(1) In the event the family already has an existing child support case, the only action required is a memo to the appropriate OCSS district office notifying them of the certification.
(2) Prior to October 1, 2013, child/spousal support is always counted as income less any applicable income disregard. This income inclusion applies whether it is redirected to the OCSS or retained by the member. Effective October 1, 2013, see rules regarding financial eligibility for the individual's eligibility group to determine whether child or spousal support is counted as income.
(3) Children who are in custody of OKDHS may be exempt from referral to OCSS. Should the pursuit of the OCSS services be determined to be detrimental to the OKDHS CFSD service plan, an exemption may be approved.

317:35-5-45.Determination of income and resources for children and parents and caretaker relatives

[Revised 09-24-13] 
(a) Prior to October 1, 2013. Income is determined in accordance with OAC 317:35-10 for individuals categorically related to AFDC. Unless questionable, the income of categorically needy individuals who are categorically related to AFDC does not require verification. Individuals categorically related to AFDC are excluded from the AFDC resource test. Certain AFDC rules are specific to money payment cases and are not applicable when only SoonerCare services are requested. Exceptions to the AFDC rules are:
(1) the deeming of the parent(s)' income to the minor parent;
(2) the deeming of the sponsor's income to the sponsored alien;
(3) the deeming of stepparent income to the stepchildren. The income of the stepparent who is not included for SoonerCare in a family case is not deemed according to the stepparent liability. Only the amount of the stepparent's contribution to the individual is considered as income. The amount of contribution is determined according to OAC 317:35-10-26(a)(8), Person acting in the role of a spouse;
(4) the AFDC lump sum income rule. For purposes of SoonerCare eligibility, a period of ineligibility is not computed;
(5) mandatory inclusion of minor blood-related siblings or minor dependent children. For SoonerCare purposes, the family has the option to exclude minor blood-related siblings and/or minor dependent children;
(6) the disregard of one half of the earned income;
(7) dependent care expense. For SoonerCare only, dependent care expenses may be deducted for an in-home provider who, though not approved, would have qualified had the qualification process been followed;
(8) AFDC trust rule. The availability of trusts for all SoonerCare only cases is determined according to OAC 317:35-5-41.6;
(9) AFDC Striker rules. Striker status has no bearing on SoonerCare eligibility;
(10) ET&E Sanction rule. The ET&E status has no bearing on SoonerCare eligibility. However, a new SoonerCare application is required.
(b) Effective October 1, 2013. Income is determined in accordance with the Modified Adjusted Gross Income (MAGI) methodology for individuals related to the children and parent and caretaker relatives groups. See Subchapter 6 of this Chapter for MAGI rules. 

317:35-5-46.Determination of income and resources for categorical relationship to pregnancy-related services

[Revised 09-24-13]
(a) Prior to October 1, 2013. Countable income for an individual categorically related to pregnancy-related services is determined in the same manner as for an individual categorically related to AFDC. (See OAC 317:35-5-45). Eligibility is based on the income received in the first month of certification with changes in income not considered after certification. Individuals categorically related to pregnancy-related services are excluded from a resource test.
(b) Effective October 1, 2013. Income is determined in accordance with the Modified Adjusted Gross Income (MAGI) methodology for individuals related to the pregnancy group. See Subchapter 6 of this Chapter for MAGI rules. Eligibility is based on the income received in the first month of certification with changes in income not considered after certification, and there is no resource test

317:35-5-47.Determination of income and resources for categorical relationship to Disability for TB infected individuals
[Revised 08-01-07]
Countable income and resources for an individual categorically related because of a diagnosis of TB are determined in accordance with rules for individuals determined aged, blind, or disabled. (See OAC 317:35-5-41 through 317:35-5-41.11 and 317:35-5-42.)

317:35-5-48.Reserved
[Reserved]

317:35-5-49.Determination of income and resources for categorical relationship to TEFRA
[Revised 08-01-07]
Countable income and resources for a child categorically related to disability for TEFRA are determined in accordance with rules for individuals determined aged, blind, or disabled (see OAC 317:35-5-41 through 317:35-5-41.11, 317:35-5-42, and 317:35-7-36). Income and resources may not exceed the maximum standards as shown on OKDHS Appendix C-1, Schedules VIII. B. and D.

Disclaimer. The OHCA rules found on this Web site are unofficial. The official rules are published by the Oklahoma Secretary of State Office of Administrative Rules as Title 317 of the Oklahoma Administrative Code. To order an official copy of these rules, contact the Office of Administrative Rules at (405) 521-4911.